Australia continues to be a net exporter of tourists

The gap between inbound and outbound tourism numbers continues to grow on the back of a strong Aussie dollar, according to a report from the Tourism and Transport Forum (TTF).  

The report said the differential between international visitors coming to Australia and Australians travelling overseas is forecast to be 1.2 million in 2010.

Executive director of the TTF Brett Gale told delegates at last week’s Tourism Futures Conference in Brisbane the strong Australian dollar was a contributory factor. He urged the industry to focus on emerging markets and make tourism development easier.

Gale added: “We need to cut through the red tape and regulation and make it easier to come up with new tourism product, whether it is allowing eco-sensitive development in our natural landscapes or new hotels in our cities. The red tape gets in the way and we can’t offer things that overseas visitors want.”

Meanwhile, Access Economics director Chris Richardson said a strong dollar would not necessarily hurt inbound tourism numbers in the long term as people become more prosperous in emerging economies. However, he warned Australia’s share of that new business would be determined by exchange rates.

“You can have brilliant marketing campaigns and all the rest of it, but the Australian dollar rules ‘the dollars’ as far as travellers are concerned,” he said.

0 thoughts on “Australia continues to be a net exporter of tourists

  • July 14, 2010 at 8:19 pm
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    What does TTF know about red tape? What red tape are they talking about? No substance here. Just noise.

    Reply
  • July 14, 2010 at 10:09 pm
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    Ladies and gentlemen coming at you live over 13 hours a day it’s Greg Cole – want an opinion on a Thumbrella post? fear not Greg Cole is here – just check the recent comments section nearly 50% will be his. Don’t worry it’s free he just can’t get enough!

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  • July 15, 2010 at 9:13 am
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    Hey Greg, ignore the knockers. I don’t always agree with what you say, but it’s great that someone in the industry has an opinion. We need more like you.

    Cheers

    Martin – Thumbrella

    Reply
  • July 15, 2010 at 9:13 am
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    I dont know what this is about but it seems a little nonsensical Tony to bag out Greg everytime he comments. Are you going to stalk him throughout these articles?

    What did you think about the red tape issue?

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  • July 15, 2010 at 12:49 pm
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    Hi Martin, his comments aren’t related to any topic except me, and he probably isn’t called Tony. Those who hide behind false names are ok if they have something interesting to say. If they’re just lazily having a crack at people then what else can we do but ignore them. Why he finds me interesting I don’t know.

    By commenting as often as I do I fully expect people to disagree and to banter and to be funny and be serious in response.

    I wonder if Tony writes to the newspapers every time Ross Gittins or Miranda Devine makes a comment, which is daily. Must be a busy boy.

    James, my comments are saying that in my opinion the TTF are good at chasing headlines but never point us to the detail. In this case Red Tape. I know they must have detail somewhere, but where is it.

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  • July 16, 2010 at 8:36 am
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    I’m not sure that Australia has higher levels of control on development than other comparible economies. You may find control much less in our SE Asian competitor countries but that is inevitable.

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  • July 16, 2010 at 12:39 pm
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    Not hard to find red tape here in Oz! It`s a noxious vine strangling the tall timber everywhere..

    Our country has the highest level of red tape in the Southern hemisphere. European visitors, many from possibly over-regulated countries with large populations, can`t get over the contrast between our laid-back, she`ll be right attitude and the draconian laws and regs we all take for granted.

    Whether it`s bicycle helmets, compulsory voting, liquor licensing, adventure company waivers and all the rest, Oz has it in spades over almost every other country.

    It`s as if Ozzies, some descended from convicts, have a bent for regulating the Wild Colonial Boy of our collective past out of existence.

    Over regulation is a deserving topic of it`s own forum under it`s own heading and long has been!

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  • July 16, 2010 at 3:26 pm
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    There’s the air-conditioning regulation for buses in QLD: If the forecast air temp is above 28c you have to turn it on. Cost thousands to draft that one. Or in NSW you must have a procedure to ensure there’s nobody left on your bus when you finish for the day. There’s another law that says you must carry tourists on a tourist bus.

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  • July 16, 2010 at 5:40 pm
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    Greg, you can take the piss as much as you like but you are missing the point that your margins would be higher if there was less of it here, as would most other industries.

    Compliance issues are a bain on our Australian tourism industry and leave us at a major dis-advantage in comparison to S

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  • July 16, 2010 at 5:46 pm
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    Africa, South America and Asia, and that`s a fact.

    As an industry representative on BTAP, I`d expect you to question the need for any unnecessary rules and regulations that dog us, rather than accepting them unquestioningly.

    The bureaucrats are thinking up more ridiculous measures as I write and will continue to, if allowed.

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  • July 16, 2010 at 6:23 pm
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    Scotty, its after 5pm so go and do your homework. Topic today is fact-checking. 2nd Topic is Australiana 101: taking the piss and how un-Australian it is to tell people not to.

    If you think I’m missing the point then you’re asleep at the wheel. In my position I deal with this stuff country-wide day in and day out. I’ve had audits from three different state regulatory bodies in as many months. How many audits have you had in the last 6-months? How many govt representatives have you met about such issues in the last 6-months.I’ve met 5. All of their views set in concrete. But work with them we must.

    The absence of comment or position here is not reflective of action or work in progress. When I feel the need to share minor or major gains with you in our business I will. Our Chairman will share BTAP gains. Until then please be assured the right people are dealing with this stuff.

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  • July 16, 2010 at 7:27 pm
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    Let`s leave what`s un-Australian to the popular press.

    After having to implement some extremely costly and unnecessary regulations over the last 23 years, forgive me if I don`t feel re-assured by your last posting.

    If it is the case that you are the Tourism sector`s Masked Super Hero, cunningly disguised as Greg Cole, then maintain some consistency with your postings: your replies to this particular thread display a cavalier attitude to a serious topic.

    Let those of us who aren`t as familiar with you as others most obviously must be know when your tongue is planted in your cheek.

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  • July 19, 2010 at 8:18 am
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    Red tape is also slowly strangling the boating industry in the Whitsundays. In the last few years we have seen the introduction of many new initiatives thought up by bumbling bureaucrats. We have seen the introduction of council food licenses, new chlorinators for our sewerage systems, new fire regulations, new rules for logging our passages, new rules for taking people on walks in national parks, A recent addition has even been as silly to say that all staff working in the Whitsundays in national parks actually have to carry an 8 page permit on their person, whilst walking on the islands.
    I propose a new rule for tourism operators. No government department can introduce a new rule or legislation unless some other rule or regulation is removed or simplified… now wouldn’t that be a change for the better…. an actual simple plan to reduce red tape… Otherwise I agree definitely with this thread our passengers will simply choose other destinations as we over regulate the industry.

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  • July 19, 2010 at 1:12 pm
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    Keith, that`s definitely a EUREKA! idea, mate. Logical and, thus, NEVER going to be implemented.

    This is the only popular on-line forum for our industry, as fur as I know: surely, out of all the talent, experience and hard work that correspondents have over a wide variety of fields, we can come up with other such suggestions and cures for what ails our product?

    Even leading to forming an effective pressure group or influencing existing bodies to fight harder for a simpler and more coherent Government response to problems we all face.

    To quote Graeme Chapman from “Life of Brian” : “Brothers! We should unite against our common enemy!”

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  • July 19, 2010 at 10:11 pm
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    It’s like this,…. government departments need to keep making up bullshit regulations so they can keep employed. When was the last time you have seen a shire council road crew take on a job bigger than a pothole fill? They contract out jobs these days as it’s more productive and less of a cost, but then they have to create new positions for the nearly redundant workers. So hence theres a regulation for how many people can watch someone do the work and who do you think gets to supervise it…..

    My advice to the bureaucrats….give the dog a boner, scratch it’s nuts and blow it!

    Reply
  • July 20, 2010 at 10:39 am
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    I heard a bloke on Counterpoint (ABC Radio) suggesting we adapt the concept of an ETS to other spheres of life. One idea was to have a trading scheme in Red Tape. Don’t quote me but I think the idea was that Govt departments can get financial credits by reducing their red tape and also trade in red tape (reduction) credits.
    Clever eh?

    Reply

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